Sho(w) Ya Some Japanese Food

Shoya IzakayaChamblee, GA, USA

This is one of my favorite izakayas in the Atlanta suburbs.  Truth be told, it is probably the only true Japanese izakaya in this city unless there are a few that I have yet to become aware about.  Izakayas are known for their “bar food”, or as some would call it, “Japanese tapas”.  Some would go so far as to call it “Japanese dim sum”.  Whatever you want to call it, it is delicious!  Shoya has an extensive menu, ranging from grilled plates, to sushi, to rolls, to ramen, to small plates, to salads and chirashi bowls.  They have it all.  However, just because you have it all doesn’t mean it’s good right?  Wrong.  Shoya actually serves it pretty well and true to tastes (although they did fail on one dish tonight).  I will put this to the test on my upcoming trip to Asia though with my 4day layover in Japan!

My friend A. came to visit Atlanta for the dental convention at the end of March (yes that’s how delayed this post is).  Coming from North Carolina where Asian food is far and few, he wanted to get some good Japanese food.  What better place than Shoya?  Are you ready? We ordered a LOT:

chuka kuraage (seasoned jellyfish salad)

  • not overly seasoned
  • good amount for a small plate and the price
  • crunchy and not overly soaked
seasoned jellyfish (chuka kuraage)

seasoned jellyfish (chuka kuraage)

kani sunomono (snow crab salad)

  • less flavor compared to the jellyfish: I would eat this first
  • different pickling: more salty vs the sour-sweet of the jellyfish
  • decent amount for small salad plate
  • snow crab was NOT salty at all
kani sunomono

kani sunomono

tamago unagi (egg and eel)

  • egg not sweet enough to my liking (not enough mirin)
  • v. small amount of unagi (eel) wrapped in the egg
  • only two pieces
  • still had flavor but not what we expected
tamago unagi

tamago unagi

fresh squid plate (ikka-something)

  • thinner cuts tasted better
  • larger cuts had that slick squid film on top, we didn’t like the texture after the smaller pieces
  • comes with quail egg you mix with the wasabi and sauce
  • raw squid is not my favorite so i can’t say I was a fan
squid

squid

sukiyaki korokke

  • sukiyaki minced beef stir-fried and made into a potato patty encrusted in panko
  • could make this at home myself (and have)
  • not too flavorful (not enough marinade in the meat and salt in the potato)
  • filling
sukiyaki korokke

sukiyaki korokke

Chicken Skin (grilled)

  • must like deep fried or very crispy chicken skin
  • not battered, is the real deal
  • come with salt (shio) or terriyaki (katsu) sauce
  • very tasty, not sure if it’s worth the price
chicken skin

chicken skin

takoyaki (“octopus ebelskivers”)

  • got the mega-plate (10 pieces)
  • no bonito flakes placed on top (the kind that billow in the wind)
  • too much katsu sauce (IMO) but my friend liked it
  • not burnt, a lot of tako (octopus)
  • favorite!
takoyaki

takoyaki

hamachi kama (fish cheeks)

  • pricey delicacy with asians (range $12-$15) 
  • supposed to be the best part and super soft
  • was really dry (BOO!)
  • huge amount of meat though and portion was generous
  • (Tokyo Shokudo does it much better)
hamachi kama

hamachi kama

All in all a summary:

      • chuka kuraage: **** (4 stars)
      • kani sunomono: *** (3 stars)
      • squid plate: ** (2 stars)
      • sukiyaki korokke: *** (3 stars)
      • tamago-unagi: ** (2 stars)
      • hamachi kama: **.75 (2.75 stars – for quantity)
      • takoyaki: **** (4 stars)
      • fried chicken skin: *** (3 stars – for price)

If you wanted to check out Shoya Izakaya for yourself sometime, you can find them at the location below.  They actually have pretty good ramen too, comparable to that of Japan.  Bon apetit!

6035 Peachtree Rd, Doraville, GA 30360
(770) 457-5555
 
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This entry was published on April 16, 2014 at 13:56. It’s filed under Japanese, restaurants, The Gastronome and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

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